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Tai Chi & Balance

Posted on December 29, 2014 by Carolyn Waterman under Featured Articles

By: Lindsay Fortin, MPT Falls due to a loss of balance are the leading cause of injury in adults over 65. In fact, one in three older adults will experience a fall each year resulting in injuries ranging from minor bruising to more serious injuries like dislocations, fractures or even head injuries. These injuries can […]

Food Drive for the NH Food Bank!

Posted on November 13, 2014 by Carolyn Waterman under Featured Articles, News

We are hosting our 4th Annual Food Drive! New Hampshire Orthopaedic Center is participating again in collecting donations for the NH Food Bank. Please feel free to come by one of our offices between November 7th and January 2nd if you would like to help by making a donation. THANK YOU!  

Hike Your Way to Health – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on October 14, 2014 by Carolyn Waterman under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Orthopaedic surgeons strongly recommend a regular exercise program to promote musculoskeletal health. An ideal exercise is one that is aerobic, strengthens the core as well as all four extremities, improves balance, is low impact, reasonably safe, and is able to be performed throughout life. The sport of hiking fulfills all the above criteria. It is […]

Thank You Everyone!

Posted on July 15, 2014 by Carolyn Waterman under Featured Articles, News

THANK YOU AGAIN! New Hampshire Union Leader’s  annual Readers’ Choice awards has listed New Hampshire Orthopaedic Center best orthopaedic office in New Hampshire for 2014! Thank you to everyone who voted!!  

Earn CME credits with NHMI!

Posted on June 16, 2014 by Carolyn Waterman under Featured Articles, News

Need to earn CME credits and looking for a seminar to join? Attend the New Hampshire Musculoskeletal Institute’s  21st Annual Symposium and earn up to 6 Contact Hours and 1 CME credit.  James Vailas, MD and Vladimir Sinkov, MD from New Hampshire Orthopaedic Center will be among the six speakers participating in this great event. Click here […]

MRI: Not the Whole Story – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on May 30, 2014 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

MRI:  Not the Whole Story William P. Rix, MD MRI is an imaging tool commonly used by orthopedists in making a diagnosis in patients with musculoskeletal complaints.  It is frequently mentioned in the media when professional athletes are injured: “Major League Baseball pitcher John Smith’s production has fallen over the past few games. MRI of […]

Heel Pain – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on February 18, 2014 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

There are two types of heel pain that send patients to the orthopedist:  back of the heel pain (Achilles Tendinitis or AT) and bottom of the heel pain (Plantar Fasciitis or PF). The symptoms in both conditions are similar:  first step, or start up, pain after getting out of bed in the morning and pain […]

Free Sports Physicals!

Posted on January 30, 2014 by amaselli under Featured Articles

Don’t miss out on your FREE Sports Physical before Spring arrives! We have teamed up with NHMI and Safe Sports Network (http://www.nhmi.net/) again and will be hosting free sports physicals in our Bedford office on Thursday March 2oth, please arrive between 5:30 and 6:30pm.  Click the image below to be linked to the registration form.  You […]

Knee Cap Pain – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 5, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Knee Cap Pain Knee pain is a common complaint in patients presenting to the orthopedist. The kneecap is often the culprit. To understand why this bone plays such a prominent role in knee pain, a review of anatomy is in order. The knee cap, known as the patella, is a fig newton size bone, triangular […]

Recommended: A Healthy Orthopaedic Lifestyle – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on August 30, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Recommended: A Healthy Orthopaedic Lifestyle Strains, sprains, overuse injuries, fractures, and arthritis: it`s a rare person who has not experienced one of these orthopaedic problems. Practicing good orthopaedic health habits can minimize the risk of incurring one or more of these common musculoskeletal conditions. Exercise Strong muscles protect our joints from injury by absorbing the […]

Pain in the Butt! – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on June 6, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Hip girdle pain is defined as pain in the buttock that radiates into the thigh.  It is a common problem, particularly in the older person. Although there are many possible causes of this condition, most are found to be  degenerative disease of the hip joint (osteoarthritis), the lumbar spine (facet arthritis, lumbar stenosis) or the […]

Shoulder Pain: The Big Three – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on April 9, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

SHOULDER PAIN – The Big Three “My shoulder hurts, Doc”.  This is a common complaint heard by the orthopedist. The history is remarkably consistent:  gradual onset of increasing shoulder and upper arm pain, with or without a preceding, usually minor, injury. The diagnosis is most often one of three conditions we`ll call “the Big Three”:  […]

Osteoporosis: Update – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on January 7, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

This is an update on Osteoporosis (OP) and Fragility Fractures (FFs), conditions initially introduced in our October and December 2010 columns.  I recommend a review of those earlier columns. A brief summary is as follows:      OP is defined as “thin bones “and is due to inadequate calcification of the skeleton FFs are fractures through […]

Get in Shape for Elective Surgery – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on December 7, 2012 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

We all know that to be successful in a sport we must get in shape. Did you know the same principle applies to surgery? Just as running a marathon takes its toll on the body, so does surgery. Recovering optimally from both requires planning and preparation. Stop Smoking Even a few weeks of not smoking […]

Do I Need Surgery, Doc? – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 6, 2012 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

This is a common question in an orthopedic practice.  The answer lies at the end of an algorithm of treatment options based on science and physician experience. Orthopaedic problems can be divided into those that are “surgical” and those that are not. The surgical group can be further subdivided into those with absolute (definite) indications […]

Smoking: Bad for the Bones, Too – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on September 17, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

It is well known that smoking is bad for the heart and lungs, but did you know it’s very harmful to the bones and their soft tissues? The ingredients in cigarette smoke impair the body’s ability to deliver oxygen, immune cells, and bone and soft tissue repair cells to fractures and surgical wounds. Smokers have […]

Walk This Way, Master – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on July 26, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

The title of this month`s column is a line spoken by Marty Feldman in the classic movie Young Frankenstein.  I borrowed it to introduce a way of exercise walking that I highly recommend.  It`s called a two point reciprocal gait and it involves using 2 canes, (or hiking poles, walking sticks, etc) while ambulating.  Each […]

Meet the Tendinopathies, a Very Dysfunctional Family – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on May 17, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

“Doc, I have a tendinitis that keeps coming back.”  This is a common complaint heard in the orthopedic office, but the term “tendinitis” is misused in this context.  Tendinitis is an acute condition that typically resolves with proper treatment and does not recur. What this patient has is a tendinopathy. The patient`s use of this […]

The Vicious Cycle: Injury, Rest, Atrophy, Re-injury – or – How to Avoid Resetting the Clock – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on February 29, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Muscle and ligament strains are common orthopedic complaints.  The pain from these injuries can be disabling, and proper rehabilitation is essential to ensure a full recovery. Resting a sprain is natural and appropriate, but it comes at a cost.   When muscles are not used they become weak and lose bulk (atrophy) in response to their […]

The Orthopaedic Evaluation: It’s All In The Mechanics – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on January 12, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

“Scratch an orthopedist and you`ll find a carpenter”.  There is truth in this old saying, as both occupations use mechanical principles in their daily work. Pain, stiffness, weakness, and instability are common symptoms that prompt people to seek orthopedic advice.  We search for the diagnosis, medical or surgical, but our focus is on an orthopedic […]

Why it is Common for Female Athletes to Tear their Knee Ligaments – By William P Rix, M.D.

Posted on November 30, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Why it is Common for Female Athletes to Tear their Knee Ligaments,or “Move your Feet, Not your Hands” Female athletes tear their anterior cruciate ligaments as much as eight times more than male athletes. This is due in part to anatomic and physiologic factors, but much is due to what we call “neuromuscular deficits or […]

BURSITIS: More than Meets the Eye – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 29, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

A bursa is a thin sack positioned between two anatomic structures that rub together. Bursae are filled with a slippery fluid which facilitates motion by reducing friction. Typically, bursae are located between a prominent boney eminence (often with a tendon attached to it) and skin, bone or another tendon. When bursae become inflamed or irritated, […]

Get in Shape for Elective Surgery – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 14, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

We all know that to be successful in a sport we must get in shape. Did you know the same principle applies to surgery? Just as running a marathon takes its toll on the body, so does surgery. Recovering optimally from both requires planning and preparation. Stop Smoking Even a few weeks of not smoking […]

BURSITIS: More than Meets the Eye – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on August 1, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

A bursa is a thin sack positioned between two anatomic structures that rub together.  Bursae are filled with a slippery fluid which facilitates motion by reducing friction.  Typically, bursae are located between a prominent boney eminence (often with a tendon attached to it) and skin, bone or another tendon. When bursae become inflamed or irritated, […]

Fools, Tools, Snoops, and IDIOTS – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on February 1, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

This is not the ranting of a crazy man, it’s a mnemonic.  A mnemonic is a catchy phrase whose letters stand for categories that by themselves are hard to remember. I love mnemonics and use them liberally to help me organize the vast amount of data in orthopedics. They are particularly useful in confusing cases […]

Bisphosphonates: or “Patching up Faulty Construction” – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on December 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Last month we talked about osteoporosis and its risk for fragility fractures.   In addition to calcium, Vitamin D, and exercise, a class of drugs called bisphosphonates is often used to treat this common condition. Bisphosphonates are anti-resorptive drugs that inhibit osteoclasts, the cells that break down bone and release calcium.   By slowing osteoclastic activity, osteoblasts, […]

Osteoporosis: A House With Too Few Nails – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on October 4, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Osteoporosis is a condition of bone weakness due to suboptimal calcification of the skeleton. When the carpenter builds a house, he uses an optimal number of nails to achieve maximum strength in the resulting structure.  It is the same with our skeleton.  If our skeleton is optimally calcified, then it also will achieve maximal strength.  […]

Orthopedic Emergencies: When to Call the Office – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on August 4, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Orthopedic emergencies are those conditions that should be seen by a physician that day to prevent potential harm to the patient.                   In today’s column we will not be talking about major trauma with deep lacerations, loss of consciousness, and fractures that obviously demand an immediate visit to the hospital ER.    We will focus on […]

Why Obesity Matters in Orthopedics or Extra Weight means Extra Risk – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on July 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

It’s common knowledge that obesity is a medical risk for heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes.  Did you know it directly impacts your orthopedic health as well? One third of Americans are obese, with obesity defined as a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 (see nhlbisupport.com to calculate yours).  Carrying this extra weight contributes significantly […]

Arthritis, Bursitis, Tendinitis…What does it all mean? – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on May 4, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

You’re at the doctors’ office and you’ve just been told “you have arthritis”.  You nod your head knowingly, maybe repeating the term to yourself.  But do you actually know what the word means?   How about bursitis, or tendinitis?  What’s the difference? Let’s  look at these terms in some detail. First of all, none of these […]

Making the Diagnosis: It's All In The Clues – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on April 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Doctors are not much different from detectives.  A “crime” has been committed (the health problem) and the “perpetrator” (diagnosis) is sought. In both professions clues are used to solve the case. When you go to the orthopedist you have a “chief complaint”: pain, weakness, numbness, instability etc, and you have a “clinical history”: a timeline […]

In Praise of Bones – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on January 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Did you know that bone is the only tissue in the body that heals with itself?   If you cut your skin, it heals with scar tissue. If you lacerate your liver, brain, kidney, lung, it heals with scar tissue.  If you fracture a bone, it heals with bone.  It makes sense, doesn`t it?   If the […]