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Knee Replacement in Congo – Part I

Posted on August 5, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

by: Kathleen A Hogan, MD The Democratic Republic of Congo The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), formerly known as Zaire, is not a tourist destination.    Because of ongoing violence, much of the country is inaccessible.   There are warnings for travelers posted on the US Embassy website. There is an ongoing yellow fever epidemic.   The DRC … Read More

Top Three Things to Do Before Having Surgery

Posted on July 5, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

by: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD Everyone who has surgery worries about what can go wrong.   No surgery, no matter how minor, is without some risk.   However there are a few things that you can do before having surgery which may reduce the risk of complications. Stop Smoking Yes, smoking can result in lung cancer.   But … Read More

36 hours in the Congo

Posted on June 2, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

by Kathleen A. Hogan, MD “Going up that river was like traveling back to the earliest beginnings of the world, when vegetation rioted on the earth and the big trees were kings.”  Joseph Conrad – Heart of Darkness Traveling to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) It takes approximately 19 hours, flying over 7000 miles … Read More

Arthritis of the Thumb

Posted on May 23, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Wang, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

by: Jinsong Wang, MD, PhD Your thumb accounts for about half of your hand function. Sometimes people don’t realize how important the thumb is until it doesn’t function properly anymore. The most common arthritis involving the thumb is thumb CMC joint arthritis. This is the joint where the thumb attaches to the hand. This joint … Read More

How to Lose Weight When Your Joints Hurt

Posted on April 26, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

by: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD People who are obese (body mass index -BMI >30) have an almost seven times increase in the incidence of knee arthritis compared to those with a normal body mass index (BMI 18.5-25). Weight loss has been shown to reduce the pain associated with knee arthritis and improve function.  However, many … Read More

Do I Need a Joint Replacement?

Posted on March 24, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles, Uncategorized

by: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD As a specialist in joint replacement, I am frequently asked “How will I know when it is time to have my hip or knee replaced?”  As we age, most people experience intermittent pain in their joints, usually worse with activity.   Sometimes this pain is due to arthritis, but there are … Read More

Four of Our Physicians Named ‘Top Docs’ for 2016

Posted on March 20, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

Each year, roughly 3,000 physicians licensed to practice in New Hampshire are asked by New Hampshire Magazine to nominate specialists they would most recommend to family and friends. Those selected as ‘Top Doctors’ received the greatest number of recommendations within 45 specialties. New Hampshire Orthopaedic Center physicians have been voted ‘Top Doctors’ in New Hampshire … Read More

Viscosupplementation for Knee Arthritis

Posted on March 4, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

by: Kathleen A Hogan, MD Over 30% of Americans over the age of 60 are affected by the symptoms of knee arthritis, such as pain, stiffness, swelling, and activity limitations.  Initial treatments for knee arthritis include activity modification, weight loss, physical therapy, bracing, anti-inflammatory medications, and injections with steroids or hyaluronic acid (also called a … Read More

Cross Training and Whole Body Fitness

Posted on March 3, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Bouvier, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

By: Daniel Bouvier, MD In this current age athletes participate in sports well into middle age and beyond. We find children specializing in sports at a young age, high volume, and high intensity early in their skeletal development. Gone are the days of free play, climbing trees, building walls and forts, and kickball games in … Read More

Planning for a Medical Mission Trip

Posted on February 2, 2016 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

by: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD In July, I will be traveling to Kinshasa, the capital of The Democratic Republic of Congo with WOGO – Women Orthopedist Global Outreach – on a medical mission to perform knee replacements at the Biamba Marie Mutombo Hospital.  There will be over 50 people who travel with us – including … Read More

Insomnia After Joint Replacement

Posted on December 21, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

by Kathleen A. Hogan, M.D. One of the most common complaints after knee or hip replacement is difficulty sleeping. By six weeks after surgery, most people are having less pain in their new joint and increasing their activity. But they often lay awake at night, unable to sleep. Why does this happen and what can … Read More

Why Do Artificial Joints Wear Out?

Posted on November 2, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

By Kathleen Hogan, M.D. Nothing lasts forever. Articular cartilage allows our joints to move freely without pain. As that cartilage wears out or becomes damaged, arthritis develops. If the resulting pain and deformity from arthritis becomes severe, many joints can be replaced, usually with metal and plastic implants. However, these artificial joints wear out with … Read More

Stress Fractures

Posted on October 27, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Marino, Featured Articles

By Anthony R. Marino, MD Stress fractures are tiny cracks in bone. Runner’s often have stress fractures in the weight bearing bones of their lower legs and feet. Stress fractures are serious running injuries that pose a significant long term limitation and require considerable time off. Cause The most common cause of stress fractures is … Read More

How Much Do I Need to Exercise? 30 Minutes a Day

Posted on October 3, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A Hogan, MD Weight matters to all of us, whether we’re size 6 or 16. Regular exercise can help with weight maintenance and loss, especially when combined with a healthy diet. Exercise also elevates mood, improves cardiovascular health, and increases bone density. Inactivity on the other hand, contributes to the development of obesity, … Read More

Fall Prevention Awareness

Posted on September 25, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter, Jake A. Motha, DPT

By: Jake A. Motha, DPT   Have you fallen in the past year? Do you feel unsteady when standing or walking? Do you worry about falling? If you answered yes, you are not alone. In fact, one out of three older adults age 65 or greater will fall within the year. It is no surprise … Read More

How to Choose An Orthopaedic Specialist


Posted on September 2, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD Everyday when you get out of bed, your knees crack. They hurt when you go up and down stairs. You have tried taking ibuprofen and tylenol but that no longer seems to work. You mention your knee pain to your primary care doctor who gets X-rays and tells you that … Read More

Iliotibial band syndrome

Posted on September 1, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Marino, Featured Articles

By Anthony R. Marino, MD Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is caused by irritation of the iliotibial band, which is the muscle and tendon on the outside of your knee, as it rubs the outside of the distal femur.  It is caused by increasing mileage too quickly, changes in your downhill running, muscle imbalance around the … Read More

Runner’s Knee

Posted on August 5, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Marino, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

By: Anthony R. Marino, MD Runner’s knee, also called patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), is an irritation of the cartilage or tissue underneath the kneecap or the patella. The majority of running injuries are knee injuries and 50% of runners over time experience knee pain. PFPS typically flares up after long runs, when you’ve had to … Read More

Preventing Heat Stroke

Posted on July 27, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter, Scott M. Evans, PA-C

By: 
Scott M. Evans, PA-C Now that we’ll be experiencing the heat and humidity of summer, it is very important to understand the symptoms of heat stroke and how to prevent it. Heat stroke is a very serious and potentially dangerous injury that requires medical attention immediately.
 
Heat stroke is the most severe of a … Read More

Afraid to Have A Knee Replacement? You Are Not Alone

Posted on July 16, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD Each year, over 700,000 total knee replacements are performed per year in the United States. Many people who have arthritis can have pain relief with non-operative treatments such as weight loss, braces, activity modification, medications, and injections. But when these treatments are no longer effective, joint replacement is often recommended. … Read More

The Evolution of Joint Replacements

Posted on July 7, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Joseph, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

by: Douglas M. Joseph, MD This year, about 800,000 people in the US will have either a hip or knee replacement. Total hip and knee “survival” or success is estimated by The Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery to be greater than 90% in several twenty-five year follow up studies. The Evolution of Joint Replacements We’ve come … Read More

Return to Golf and Tennis After Joint Replacement 

Posted on June 18, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD As the last of the snow melts away, thoughts turn away from the ski slopes and towards the golf course and the tennis courts.    Unfortunately, if you have been living with hip or knee pain, these recreational activities may be more painful than pleasurable.     As a joint … Read More

What is Arthritis?

Posted on May 19, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD Today I’d like to answer the question, What is arthritis? One of my patients recently expressed concern that her primary care physician had diagnosed her with “degenerative joint disease.” She was worried that this disease was spreading throughout her body causing arthritis in all of her joints, and wondered what … Read More

What is the Cause of My Hip Pain?

Posted on May 12, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD Your hip is hurting. Walking, sleeping, everything seems to cause your hip to hurt. The pain must be coming from your hip joint, correct? Perhaps. Sometimes it can be surprisingly difficult to determine what joint is the primary source of pain.  Hip arthritis can cause back, hip, and knee pain. … Read More

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT PLANTAR FASCIITIS

Posted on April 16, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Michaud, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

By: Marc J. Michaud, MD Plantar Fasciitis is the Most Common Ailment I See As a foot and ankle surgeon, plantar fasciitis is the most common ailment that I see in the office. Patients complain of pain along the course of the plantar fascia and especially at the insertion to the heel. It is estimated … Read More

Muscle Strain

Posted on March 31, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Bouvier, Featured Articles

By: Daniel P. Bouvier, MD What is a Muscle Strain? A strain is an injury to a muscle or tendon, which occurs when the muscle is stretched or torn.  This differs from a sprain, which is a term used to describe a stretching or tearing of ligaments.  Ligaments connect bones to other bones, whereas tendons … Read More

Traveling After Joint Replacement: Questions Answered

Posted on March 23, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD When can I travel? Will my new hip replacement set off metal detectors at the airport? Can I get a card to prove that I had my knee replaced? These are common questions of patients are planning on traveling after joint replacement. Security Screening When Traveling After Joint Replacement Hip … Read More

Why Weight Matters: Obesity and Knee Replacement

Posted on March 17, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD Obesity and knee replacement are closely linked. It is well established that people who are overweight have an increased incidence of knee arthritis at a younger age and are more likely to require knee replacement. Joint pain can limit mobility and diminish exercise tolerance which may contribute to weight gain. … Read More

Causes of Lower Leg Pain: A Long List

Posted on by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

By: William P. Rix, MD Lower leg pain on the outside of the leg (lateral leg pain) is a common presenting complaint in the orthopedist’s office. Typically the pain is felt anywhere from the outside aspect of the knee to the lateral ankle. The patient usually gives a history of gradual onset of pain without … Read More

When Your Child Has a Broken Bone: What You Need to Know!

Posted on March 2, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Blaisdell, Featured Articles, InMotion Newsletter

By: Gregory Y. Blaisdell, MD No parent wants to see their child in pain, and a broken bone causes a lot of anxiety. In this article we’ll let you know how to provide the best care when your child has a broken bone. Keep your Child Comfortable and Reduce Swelling The most important thing for … Read More

Snowbirds

Posted on February 23, 2015 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Hogan, Featured Articles

By: Kathleen A. Hogan, MD With the arrival of cold and snow, many people head south for warmer weather. One of the many reasons older people leave New Hampshire during the winter months is that their arthritic joints feel better in a warmer climate. Certainly, avoiding snow and ice can minimize your chance of falling … Read More

Tai Chi & Balance

Posted on December 29, 2014 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

By: Lindsay Fortin, MPT Falls due to a loss of balance are the leading cause of injury in adults over 65. In fact, one in three older adults will experience a fall each year resulting in injuries ranging from minor bruising to more serious injuries like dislocations, fractures or even head injuries. These injuries can … Read More

Hike Your Way to Health – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on October 14, 2014 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Orthopaedic surgeons strongly recommend a regular exercise program to promote musculoskeletal health. An ideal exercise is one that is aerobic, strengthens the core as well as all four extremities, improves balance, is low impact, reasonably safe, and is able to be performed throughout life. The sport of hiking fulfills all the above criteria. It is … Read More

MRI: Not the Whole Story – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on May 30, 2014 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

MRI:  Not the Whole Story William P. Rix, MD MRI is an imaging tool commonly used by orthopedists in making a diagnosis in patients with musculoskeletal complaints.  It is frequently mentioned in the media when professional athletes are injured: “Major League Baseball pitcher John Smith’s production has fallen over the past few games. MRI of … Read More

Heel Pain – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on February 18, 2014 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

There are two types of heel pain that send patients to the orthopedist:  back of the heel pain (Achilles Tendinitis or AT) and bottom of the heel pain (Plantar Fasciitis or PF). The symptoms in both conditions are similar:  first step, or start up, pain after getting out of bed in the morning and pain … Read More

Knee Cap Pain – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 5, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Knee Cap Pain Knee pain is a common complaint in patients presenting to the orthopedist. The kneecap is often the culprit. To understand why this bone plays such a prominent role in knee pain, a review of anatomy is in order. The knee cap, known as the patella, is a fig newton size bone, triangular … Read More

Recommended: A Healthy Orthopaedic Lifestyle – By: William P. Rix, MD

Posted on August 30, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Recommended: A Healthy Orthopaedic Lifestyle Strains, sprains, overuse injuries, fractures, and arthritis: it`s a rare person who has not experienced one of these orthopaedic problems. Practicing good orthopaedic health habits can minimize the risk of incurring one or more of these common musculoskeletal conditions. Exercise Strong muscles protect our joints from injury by absorbing the … Read More

Pain in the Butt! – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on June 6, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Hip girdle pain is defined as pain in the buttock that radiates into the thigh.  It is a common problem, particularly in the older person. Although there are many possible causes of this condition, most are found to be  degenerative disease of the hip joint (osteoarthritis), the lumbar spine (facet arthritis, lumbar stenosis) or the … Read More

Shoulder Pain: The Big Three – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on April 9, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

SHOULDER PAIN – The Big Three “My shoulder hurts, Doc”.  This is a common complaint heard by the orthopedist. The history is remarkably consistent:  gradual onset of increasing shoulder and upper arm pain, with or without a preceding, usually minor, injury. The diagnosis is most often one of three conditions we`ll call “the Big Three”:  … Read More

Osteoporosis: Update – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on January 7, 2013 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

This is an update on Osteoporosis (OP) and Fragility Fractures (FFs), conditions initially introduced in our October and December 2010 columns.  I recommend a review of those earlier columns. A brief summary is as follows:      OP is defined as “thin bones “and is due to inadequate calcification of the skeleton FFs are fractures through … Read More

Get in Shape for Elective Surgery – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on December 7, 2012 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

We all know that to be successful in a sport we must get in shape. Did you know the same principle applies to surgery? Just as running a marathon takes its toll on the body, so does surgery. Recovering optimally from both requires planning and preparation. Stop Smoking Even a few weeks of not smoking … Read More

Do I Need Surgery, Doc? – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 6, 2012 by amaselli under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

This is a common question in an orthopedic practice.  The answer lies at the end of an algorithm of treatment options based on science and physician experience. Orthopaedic problems can be divided into those that are “surgical” and those that are not. The surgical group can be further subdivided into those with absolute (definite) indications … Read More

Smoking: Bad for the Bones, Too – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on September 17, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

It is well known that smoking is bad for the heart and lungs, but did you know it’s very harmful to the bones and their soft tissues? The ingredients in cigarette smoke impair the body’s ability to deliver oxygen, immune cells, and bone and soft tissue repair cells to fractures and surgical wounds. Smokers have … Read More

Walk This Way, Master – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on July 26, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

The title of this month`s column is a line spoken by Marty Feldman in the classic movie Young Frankenstein.  I borrowed it to introduce a way of exercise walking that I highly recommend.  It`s called a two point reciprocal gait and it involves using 2 canes, (or hiking poles, walking sticks, etc) while ambulating.  Each … Read More

Meet the Tendinopathies, a Very Dysfunctional Family – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on May 17, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

“Doc, I have a tendinitis that keeps coming back.”  This is a common complaint heard in the orthopedic office, but the term “tendinitis” is misused in this context.  Tendinitis is an acute condition that typically resolves with proper treatment and does not recur. What this patient has is a tendinopathy. The patient`s use of this … Read More

The Vicious Cycle: Injury, Rest, Atrophy, Re-injury – or – How to Avoid Resetting the Clock – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on February 29, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Muscle and ligament strains are common orthopedic complaints.  The pain from these injuries can be disabling, and proper rehabilitation is essential to ensure a full recovery. Resting a sprain is natural and appropriate, but it comes at a cost.   When muscles are not used they become weak and lose bulk (atrophy) in response to their … Read More

The Orthopaedic Evaluation: It’s All In The Mechanics – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on January 12, 2012 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

“Scratch an orthopedist and you`ll find a carpenter”.  There is truth in this old saying, as both occupations use mechanical principles in their daily work. Pain, stiffness, weakness, and instability are common symptoms that prompt people to seek orthopedic advice.  We search for the diagnosis, medical or surgical, but our focus is on an orthopedic … Read More

Why it is Common for Female Athletes to Tear their Knee Ligaments – By William P Rix, M.D.

Posted on November 30, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Why it is Common for Female Athletes to Tear their Knee Ligaments,or “Move your Feet, Not your Hands” Female athletes tear their anterior cruciate ligaments as much as eight times more than male athletes. This is due in part to anatomic and physiologic factors, but much is due to what we call “neuromuscular deficits or … Read More

BURSITIS: More than Meets the Eye – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 29, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

A bursa is a thin sack positioned between two anatomic structures that rub together. Bursae are filled with a slippery fluid which facilitates motion by reducing friction. Typically, bursae are located between a prominent boney eminence (often with a tendon attached to it) and skin, bone or another tendon. When bursae become inflamed or irritated, … Read More

Get in Shape for Elective Surgery – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on November 14, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

We all know that to be successful in a sport we must get in shape. Did you know the same principle applies to surgery? Just as running a marathon takes its toll on the body, so does surgery. Recovering optimally from both requires planning and preparation. Stop Smoking Even a few weeks of not smoking … Read More

BURSITIS: More than Meets the Eye – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on August 1, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

A bursa is a thin sack positioned between two anatomic structures that rub together.  Bursae are filled with a slippery fluid which facilitates motion by reducing friction.  Typically, bursae are located between a prominent boney eminence (often with a tendon attached to it) and skin, bone or another tendon. When bursae become inflamed or irritated, … Read More

Fools, Tools, Snoops, and IDIOTS – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on February 1, 2011 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

This is not the ranting of a crazy man, it’s a mnemonic.  A mnemonic is a catchy phrase whose letters stand for categories that by themselves are hard to remember. I love mnemonics and use them liberally to help me organize the vast amount of data in orthopedics. They are particularly useful in confusing cases … Read More

Bisphosphonates: or “Patching up Faulty Construction” – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on December 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Last month we talked about osteoporosis and its risk for fragility fractures.   In addition to calcium, Vitamin D, and exercise, a class of drugs called bisphosphonates is often used to treat this common condition. Bisphosphonates are anti-resorptive drugs that inhibit osteoclasts, the cells that break down bone and release calcium.   By slowing osteoclastic activity, osteoblasts, … Read More

Osteoporosis: A House With Too Few Nails – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on October 4, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Osteoporosis is a condition of bone weakness due to suboptimal calcification of the skeleton. When the carpenter builds a house, he uses an optimal number of nails to achieve maximum strength in the resulting structure.  It is the same with our skeleton.  If our skeleton is optimally calcified, then it also will achieve maximal strength.  … Read More

Orthopedic Emergencies: When to Call the Office – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on August 4, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Orthopedic emergencies are those conditions that should be seen by a physician that day to prevent potential harm to the patient.                   In today’s column we will not be talking about major trauma with deep lacerations, loss of consciousness, and fractures that obviously demand an immediate visit to the hospital ER.    We will focus on … Read More

Why Obesity Matters in Orthopedics or Extra Weight means Extra Risk – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on July 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

It’s common knowledge that obesity is a medical risk for heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes.  Did you know it directly impacts your orthopedic health as well? One third of Americans are obese, with obesity defined as a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 (see nhlbisupport.com to calculate yours).  Carrying this extra weight contributes significantly … Read More

Arthritis, Bursitis, Tendinitis…What does it all mean? – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on May 4, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

You’re at the doctors’ office and you’ve just been told “you have arthritis”.  You nod your head knowingly, maybe repeating the term to yourself.  But do you actually know what the word means?   How about bursitis, or tendinitis?  What’s the difference? Let’s  look at these terms in some detail. First of all, none of these … Read More

Making the Diagnosis: It’s All In The Clues – By William P. Rix, MD

Posted on April 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Featured Articles

Doctors are not much different from detectives.  A “crime” has been committed (the health problem) and the “perpetrator” (diagnosis) is sought. In both professions clues are used to solve the case. When you go to the orthopedist you have a “chief complaint”: pain, weakness, numbness, instability etc, and you have a “clinical history”: a timeline … Read More

In Praise of Bones – By William P. Rix, M.D.

Posted on January 1, 2010 by NHOC Tech under Dr. Rix, Featured Articles

Did you know that bone is the only tissue in the body that heals with itself?   If you cut your skin, it heals with scar tissue. If you lacerate your liver, brain, kidney, lung, it heals with scar tissue.  If you fracture a bone, it heals with bone.  It makes sense, doesn`t it?   If the … Read More